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Istanbul: Briefly on the Asian side

When you cross Bosporus to go to the Anatolian part of Istanbul, you leave behind most of the tourist crowds and most of the city’s iconic sights. This side is primarily the living quarters of ordinary residents, quieter and of significantly lower profile than the European side.

A few defined points of interest do exist here, starting with probably the most known – the Maiden’s Tower.
Istanbul
The use of the small island for defensive and customs purposes started in the days of Ancient Greece, while the current lighthouse structure dates from the 18th century, having been restored many times over the years. The name comes from a legend not entirely dissimilar to the Sleeping Beauty fable, and it is simply an enchanting sight.

In the background in the shot above are the Topkapı Palace, Hagia Sofia, and the Blue Mosque. If we change the angle, we can place the Galata Tower in the frame.
Istanbul
The mosque in the background on the left has not been in a shot before – Fatih Mosque farther out on the historic Constantinople peninsula.

As lovely as the exterior views of the Maiden’s Tower are, setting foot on the island proper was probably the least worthwhile outlay of my time and money while in Istanbul. There is very little to see or to learn there. It ended up for me being mostly about crenelations-framed perspectives of the European-side sights. You will probably recognize them from past sets.
Istanbul
Istanbul
Istanbul
Istanbul
Istanbul
One not yet seen perspective is of the graceful suspension bridge straddling Bosporus that is the southernmost of three bridges connecting the sides of the strait.
Istanbul
We already glimpsed that bridge in the background of Ortaköy Mosque towards the end of the previous post. Here is another glimpse of it from the Asian side, with the dramatically positioned small Haci Mehmet Ali Ozturk Mosque as the main feature.
Istanbul
In the pleasant neighborhood of Kuzguncuk, this row of colorful houses serves as a fairly popular Instagram spot.
Istanbul
Istanbul
Istanbul
Çamlıca Mosque sits as apex of the Anatolian landscape above the Bosporus, deceptively close in this shot due to the lens compression, but in fact quite far.
Istanbul
The largest mosque in all of Turkey, it is also one of the youngest, not even five years old. The enormous place of worship is well worth the non-trivial effort to get to and see.
Istanbul
Istanbul
Istanbul
Istanbul
Istanbul
Istanbul
Istanbul
Istanbul
Istanbul
The remoteness of the mosque means that views from its high terraces towards the European side are usually hazy. But near perspectives are quite fetching.
Istanbul
And with that, we will start venturing outside of Istanbul for our next few sets.