Counting World Heritage sites: #78 (Stoclet House)

Brussels is within the speed-train-enabled day-trip range from Amsterdam and I used one of the days on my recent trip to hop on the train to meet up with my eldest, who had been studying in Brussels for all of the spring semester. Since I am now a self-proclaimed opportunistic World Heritage hunter, I used a portion of my spare time in town to take a look at the Stoclet House.

Taking a look from beyond the fence was all that was available to me in this instance. The building, recognized on the UNESCO list for its place in the Art Nouveau evolution, is privately-owned and not accessible to the general public. The description explicitly talks about details of the interior of the house but someone with inclination to see it, such as myself, has no such opportunity at present. Which obviously raises a question of, How can something be considered world heritage and not be available for the world to admire?

In any case, the new rule I established in the previous post allows me to add this site to my collection. Certainly hiring a taxi to make a dedicated trip away from the city center in order to take several dozen exterior photographs of the building counts as visiting this particular destination to the very limit of its accessibility.
 

Stoclet House, Brussels, Belgium

 
 

Stoclet House, Brussels, Belgium

 
 

Stoclet House, Brussels, Belgium

 
 

Stoclet House, Brussels, Belgium

 
It is an unusual and striking building. For me, the cost of the taxi ride and the time investment (about half an hour, split roughly in half by the ride to get there and the time to take the pictures) was worth it, but I suspect only someone similarly obsessed would think likewise.